Galaxy Zoo Talk

Subject: AGZ00087wa

Subject AGZ00087wa Full subject data (JSON)

Comments

  • c_cld by c_cld

    AGZ00087wa Id: GLARE 3000 z=5.08 Lyman Break Galaxy #LBG

    seen also in AGZ00087y2

    Posted

  • c_cld by c_cld

    spectrum https://arcoiris.ucolick.org/Rainbow_navigator_public/cache/CDFS/CANDELS_F160W_DR1/8542/8542.ESOWFI_Iccd.F49.cuts.png

    Posted

  • c_cld by c_cld

    more info on Hubble ID:GDS_8542

    http://tinyurl.com/njo4e3v

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    Wow, your a pro

    Posted

  • ramberts by ramberts

    It says on wiki that typical redshift is 3-4 and this one is 5, is it one of the farthest examples?

    Posted

  • Budgieye by Budgieye moderator

    SDSS has one at 5.2, and Hubble should be able to see a bit further than that, though I don't know its limit of detection of IR light.

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  • Budgieye by Budgieye moderator

    Galaxy Redshift Chart http://talk.galaxyzoo.org/#/boards/BGZ0000001/discussions/DGZ0000ulp?page=2

    Posted

  • ramberts by ramberts

    That is a very interesting chart, thanks for sharing and putting that together as well!

    Posted

  • Budgieye by Budgieye moderator

    UKIDSS found a quasar ULAS J1120+0641, at redshift 7.085 in 2011

    Posted

  • Budgieye by Budgieye moderator

    You're welcome 😃

    Posted

  • ramberts by ramberts

    Crazy to think that we are looking at light older than our solar system, almost as old as our own galaxy!

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  • Capella05 by Capella05 moderator

    I would take the redshift on NED with a pinch of salt - the link posted below has it estimated at 2.59 - looks like both are estimates 😃

    Posted

  • Capella05 by Capella05 moderator

    When you see a (?) or PHOTO after the redshift value in NED it means it is an estimate 😃 Hope this helps! 😃

    Posted

  • ramberts by ramberts

    There's a journal report about GLARE surveys that says this is most likely a galactic dwarf star
    http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0701211.pdf

    Posted

  • Capella05 by Capella05 moderator

    Yes, @C_cld mentioned it in his original post. The paper is quite old 2007 - I did read it earlier. Another 3 more recent references 😃

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  • Capella05 by Capella05 moderator

    Which I have not had time to read - so I do not know what the final consensus was 😃

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    ahh, well either way, really interesting stuff

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  • Capella05 by Capella05 moderator

    It is 😃 That is why I love science! Something new everyday! I will try to read the other papers...

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  • SundogWE by SundogWE

    is the green a #quasar? And the orange an #edge on? is this light older than our solar system as was noted earlier?

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    Hey Sundog, almost all of the Hubble galaxies light are older than our solar system which is estimated to be around 5 billion years old.

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    Pretty crazy! Some of the galaxies and quasars lights are over 12 billion to a little over 13 billion years old

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    The Milky Way is estimated at around 13.2 billion years old 😃

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    Anything with a redshift of .5 or more is older than our solar system, but keep in mind the ages of stuff seems to keep getting older w time

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  • SundogWE by SundogWE

    Thank you all!

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  • SundogWE by SundogWE

    is the green spot a quasar? Thanks you!

    Posted

  • ramberts by ramberts

    The journal report I posted said it's likely a galactic star but said it's a possibility to being Lyman-Break Galaxy. There are more report

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    that are more recent, I can't read them though under a pay-wall, so not sure if there is confirmation either way yet.

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  • Capella05 by Capella05 moderator

    No, if you read all the comments below this object has been written up in several papers - either a Lyman Break galaxy or a star 😃

    Posted

  • Capella05 by Capella05 moderator

    The answer must be in one of the papers it is referenced in, but someone will have to have the time to go through them 😃

    Posted

  • vrooje by vrooje admin, scientist

    @ramberts, at least some of the more recent papers might have counterparts at http://xxx.lanl.gov/archive/astro-ph that are free to read.

    Posted

  • ramberts by ramberts

    It's a star

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    We note that one faint star, GDS J033238.80−274953.7 (z850 =
    25.16), that we spectroscopically classify with QF = C

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    , has been
    confirmed Galactic in nature due to the detection of its proper
    motion

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    GLARE 3000 = GDS J033238.80-274953.7

    Posted

  • ramberts by ramberts

    Thanks Vrooje, I didn't know, I logged into my old college website and was able to get the article

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  • CosmicBadger by CosmicBadger

    Bright green circular blob

    Posted

  • Budgieye by Budgieye moderator

    any final decision on this? Is it a white dwarf? quasar? Lyman break galaxy?

    Posted

  • ramberts by ramberts

    M. Stiavelli 2008 confirmed it is a star in this article
    http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/695/2/1163/pdf/apj_695_2_1163.pdf

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  • Budgieye by Budgieye moderator

    Thank you, ramberts 😃

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  • ramberts by ramberts

    no problem, I haven't seen LBG's this bright on examples from articles or on this survey, I think most are going to be much darker greens

    Posted

  • ramberts by ramberts

    Quasars might be this bright...? Not sure, haven't seen enough examples at z>5

    Posted